New Post-Wedding Trend: Many-Moons

 

Traditionally, after getting married, newlyweds will take a honeymoon. However, there are have also been trends like buddymoons, minimoons or earlymoons. But now there’s an even newer trend happening...“manymoons.”

According to Yahoo

“I've seen more and more of my couples switching up the tradition of honeymooning for two weeks right after the wedding,” says Amy Shey Jacobs, a wedding planner with Chandelier Events. “Instead, they’re opting for multiple mini-vacations over the course of their first newlywed year.” Yes, instead of taking weeks off of work to go on one big trip after saying “I do,” couples are planning a series of smaller honeymoons to celebrate their new Mr. and Mrs. status.

Trying to rack up those passport stamps is one of the main reasons Jacobs believes “manymoons” are on the rise. “I like to call ‘Millennial Wanderlust,’” she says. “Today's couples don't want to sit on the same beach for 10 days straight. Often, they want to mix it up and yes, sip some cocktails in Tulum but at the same time, they want to take in the artists season in Prague. It’s easier to do that by taking shorter trips to more places.”

The other reason there’s a boom is a bit more practical: careers. “Couples can't get away from work when they want to anymore,” says Jacobs. “The pressure doesn't comport with the traditional two-weeks-off-the-grid honeymoon. So, many moons allow for multiple long weekends away that couples can take when everyone else in the world turns off, too like holiday weekends.”

So, how do you go about planning your “manymoons?” Sit down with your future spouse and think of your top five destinations each and see if any overlap, have similar vibes (i.e., food-focused) and if any spots are close to one another. Narrow it down to your top four or five and then get out a calendar.

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Chris Carmichael

Chris Carmichael

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